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Reconsider the name 'Tibetan Government in Exile': Tibetan Youth Cong

posted Aug 31, 2011, 4:39 PM by The Tibetan Political Review   [ updated Sep 1, 2011, 7:58 AM ]
By Amitava Banerjee
Originally published in Hindustan Times on August 28, 2011.


Tibetan Youth Congress (TYC), the largest pro-independence Tibetan organisation worldwide has resolved to send in a petition to the Tibetan Parliament to reconsider the name "Tibetan Government in Exile" instead of the new nomenclature "Organisation of the Tibetan People." The Tibetan Parliament's rechristening of "Tibetan government-in-exile," to the "Organisation of the Tibetan People" last month, has not gone down well with a large section of the Tibetan community.

"We are refugees and we have to continue our struggle under the banner of Tibetan government-in-exile. The very nomenclature Tibetan government-in-exile bears both our identity and binds us together for struggle for independence. The new nomenclature Organization of the Tibetan People is rather confusing" feels TYC President Tsewang Rigzin.

TYC with 87 chapters worldwide had had a four day long working committee meeting followed by a training programme in Darjeeling in West Bengal. The meeting and workshop which ended on Saturday discussed the course of action to be undertaken by the TYC in the next calendar year and was attended by 122 delegates from 39 chapters worldwide.

The TYC resolved to concentrate on sensitizing the masses through awareness programs on the Tibetan Freedom Movement. "We will highlight the atrocities committed against the Tibetans by the Chinese in Tibet; the autocratic environment that persists in Tibet; Illegal detention of political prisoners including Panchen Lama- the world’s youngest political prisoner; Forceful demographic change by promoting Hun Chinese population explosion in Tibet, large scale unplanned development projects destabilizing the fragile ecosystem of the region. More films and documentaries will be made, to be used for creating awareness" Rigzin.

TYC discussed the recent historic change with HH the Dalai Lama stepping down from the post of political head and handing over charge to the Kalon Tripa (Tibetan Prime Minister.)

The TYC hailed HH the Dalai Lama's decision to empower Tibetan political leaders. "However we still adhere to our stand which is complete independence for Tibet. We do not subscribe to the "Autonomy for Tibet theory" of his HH Dalai Lama. Once Tibet is freed from the forceful Chinese occupation, even HH the Dalai Lama along with all the Tibetan refugees can return back to Tibet" stated Rigzin.

Adding to this Chief-guest of the inaugural function, His Eminence Shingza Rinpoche stated "People in Tibet often advice fleeing Tibetans: ‘When you go into exile, you must fight for Rangzen (freedom) because if it is autonomy you are fighting for then you might as well come back. We in Tibet do all that we can inside here; your responsibility being outside is to keep the fight alive.'"

Tracing the importance of Darjeeling as the location for the 42nd Working Committee meeting of the TYC, Tenzin Tsundue, a renowned Tibetan Activist from Dharamsala chapter stated "His Holiness the 13th Dalai Lama stayed for two years in exile between 1910 to 1912 in Darjeeling. He later returned to Tibet and subsequently declared the Independence of Tibet in 1913. This has a great symbolic significance. We are all very happy to be here meeting many Tibetans who have been living here even before the Chinese invasion of Tibet and all this exile phenomena happened. Darjeeling had always been the capital of Tibetans living in India for centuries. Tibetans have always shared a deep bonding with the people of Darjeeling and nearby mountain regions."

Hailing the 'preservation of the historical legacy of the Tibetan government' as extremely important for safeguarding the cause of Tibetan independence, TYC pledged to preserve a copy of the Tibetan Charter (prior to last month's amendments) along with the earlier national emblem, national anthem, and the flag of Tibet.
 


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